3 Factors Shed Light On Covid-19 Oxygen Level Mystery

At Boost Oxygen, we always like to share articles about current events concerning supplemental oxygen and your health. When the Coronavirus pandemic began, we shared articles about a Covid mystery that was perplexing scientists called “silent hypoxia.” Now, scientists are beginning to have a better understanding of it.

In “3 Factors Shed Light On Covid-19 Oxygen Level Mystery” from futurity.org (based on research from Boston University) – “Researchers have begun to solve one of COVID-19’s biggest and most life-threatening mysteries: how the virus causes “silent hypoxia,” a condition where oxygen levels in the body are abnormally low.”

YOU CAN READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE

Information from the article:

“Despite experiencing dangerously low levels of oxygen, many people infected with severe cases of COVID-19 sometimes show no symptoms of shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

Hypoxia’s ability to quietly inflict damage is why health experts call it “silent.” In coronavirus patients, researchers think the infection first damages the lungs, rendering parts of them incapable of functioning properly. Those tissues lose oxygen and stop working, no longer infusing the blood stream with oxygen, causing silent hypoxia. But exactly how that domino effect occurs has not been clear until now.

“We didn’t know [how this] was physiologically possible,” says Bela Suki, professor of biomedical engineering and of materials science and engineering at Boston University and one of the coauthors of the study in Nature Communications.

Some coronavirus patients have experienced what some experts have described as levels of blood oxygen that are “incompatible with life.” Disturbingly, Suki says that many of these patients showed little to no signs of abnormalities when they underwent lung scans.”

The article continues here…

Covid Mystery

Topics: oxygen coronavirus hypoxia recovery low oxygen normal oxygen level video-only health information & research

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Written by Bill Banks